Multi-Family Properties Might Be The Way To Multi-Millions

In the current commercial real estate market, investing in multi-family homes should be on the radar. Multi-family properties don’t always have to be 20 floor sky rise apartments in a big city. They can be smaller duplexes, town homes Read more

New Real Estate View: Why The Homeless Are Big Business In New York

It's a grim scenario: In New York, there are more than 50,000 homeless. Of that number, 21,000 are children, an increase of 21 percent from last year, according to a report by the Coalition for the Homeless, a New Read more

Red Is the New Green – Chinese Investors Eye US Assets

***This blog entry is a guest post from Elton Steinberg, Marketing Associate at United Realty*** American fund managers should be aware of current and future trends that may make the Chinese account for a more significant portion of overall foreign Read more

Gimme Shelter - Foreign Investors Seek Returns and Safe Haven in US Real Estate

***This blog entry is a guest post from Elton Steinberg, Marketing Associate at United Realty*** Foreign investment has been a significant driver of the US real estate market recovery. Investors from across the globe have been responding to negative stimuli Read more

Federal Reserve

The Fiscal Cliff and Commercial Real Estate

The Fiscal Cliff, or more appropriately, the reason we are dealing with the Fiscal Cliff, will undoubtedly impact our economy in such a way that opportunities will abound in commercial real estate.

The reason Congress has been dealing with the fiscal Cliff is because our nation’s $16 trillion in debt. Worse, we have $60 trillion in unfunded government pensions, Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security obligations. In other words we are a $76 trillion debtor nation.

The Fiscal Cliff is Congress’ way of dealing with the increasing deficit necessary to service our debt, it does not address the debt itself. Our real issue is the debt itself. We can only solve our debt problem by increasing taxes or cutting our spending. Since Congress is obviously not inclined to do either, our government needs to find an alternative way of solving this problem. I believe they have.

The Federal Reserve, which historically has dealt with interest rate policy on a quarterly basis, announced in an unprecedented move that it intends to keep interest rates at the Fed discount window at 0% through early 2015. This has created an artificial cap on interest rates. At the same time, by virtue of the Fed’s QE3 policy, the Fed is effectively printing $85 billion a month—without end. Undoubtedly this devaluation of the currency will help us pay our debt off in cheap dollars. It should also have an upward pressure on interest rates. But, by virtue of the fact that interest rates remain artificially low, we will not feel the effects of this printing of money until the Fed removes its cap on interest rates.

And when that happens, watch out. Interest rates should increase dramatically. Rising interest rates will have a significant impact on commercial real estate. Rising interest rates will bring with inflation. They will also bring with them increasing rates. Properties, such as triple net lease single tenant assets which have very nominal rent increases, typically lower than CPI, will start to act and look like bonds, diminishing in value with rising interest and capitalization rates. By contrast, inflation-protected real estate, those assets with underlying leases that adjust for inflation, should be able to maintain or increase in value.

Adding to the opportunity,  we’re approaching a time when many properties can be purchased at below replacement costs, and financed at historically low interest rates. Investors are able to acquire real estate assets at below replacement cost prices, finance them with long-term low-rate financing, and protect them with inflation-protected leases will benefit from the inflationary cycle we see coming.

While the drama on Capitol Hill is certainly causing headaches for economists around the world, those in the commercial real estate industry should see opportunity amidst the frustration.

Posted on by Jacob Frydman in News, United Realty Leadership Leave a comment

Preparing For Coming Inflation

Whenever you turn on the news, you hear about our country’s $16 trillion of national debt which we cannot pay off.  Unfortunately, that’s just a small portion of our country’s financial problems.  Did you know that we also have more than $60 trillion of unfunded government pension obligations, unfunded Medicare and Medicaid and social security liabilities?  And that this debt is increasing at more than $1 trillion per year?

Just think – the US owes more than $76 trillion that iInflation Hits Real Estate Investments In Philadelphiat can’t pay off.  Worse, none of our politicians are willing to raise taxes or cut spending to deal with that problem, because if they raise taxes or cut spending they get booted out of office! As expected, they are more concerned with holding on to their jobs.

So how is our government going to deal with this problem? The same way governments have dealt with this problem throughout history – they print money.

By printing money they inflate the currency, and pay off the debt with cheap dollars, and while that may be good for the government, it is terrible for investors.

When the government prints money, people who saved their money and people who invested in fixed income, bonds and other liquid assets get hurt badly.  In some cases they can get wiped out.

And what’s worse – this time around, the government is artificially keeping interest rates at zero until early 2015 so they can keep inflating our currency without much backlash.

Ask yourselves a few questions:

  • When was the last time you remember not being able to get any interest on money in savings accounts?
  • When was the last time you remember the 10-year treasury at below 1.5%, or corporate bonds at 3%?
  • When was the last time you remember the Federal Reserve printing $40 Billion a MONTH, without end, (which they are now doing and calling it “QE-3”)?

So how do you protect against inflation?  — WITH HARD ASSETS – and frankly, there is no better hard asset than real estate.  Unlike gold or commodities, real estate can generate current income and grow in value with inflation – it has historically been used to generate cash flow and capital appreciation, and is also considered a hedge against inflation.

We are living in unprecedented times, and these events will create risks for some, and opportunities for those who prepare.

 

Posted on by Jacob Frydman in Commercial Real Estate, United Realty Leadership Leave a comment

Top 5 Biggest Commercial Mortgage Loans In NYC From January to April 2012

***This blog entry is a guest post from PropertyShark.com and contains data developed by their analysts. PropertyShark.com aggregates real estate data and listings from hundreds of public and proprietary sources into an easy-to-use yet comprehensive property research website covering a dozen major markets.***

A recent survey done by loan officers at Federal Reserve informs us that since the beginning of February 2012, banks — domestic banks in particular — have started to ease loan standards for the commercial real estate sector. At PropertyShark.com, we searched for the biggest five commercial mortgage loans in NYC from January to the end of April 2012 and compared them to the loans secured during the same period last year to see what the changes are.

The data shows that waters remained rather still this year except for two blockbuster loans in April. The rest of the loan activity stayed within last year’s patterns, when none of the commercial loans surpassed $175,000,000.

The biggest mortgage loan this year amounted to $520,000,000, with New York State Fund Housing Agency as lender. With it, real estate developer Gotham Organization is set to bring a change in the West Side’s residential landscape, as the massive housing project at 550 West 45th Street is expected to offer more than 1,000 affordable and luxury residential units at one address.

The second was secured against the 53-story tower at 1515 Broadway. Right before media giant Viacom paid a whopping amount to renew the lease of this entire building, the landlord, SL Green, obtained a loan of more than $320,000,000 from the New York branch of Bank of China. This is not the first mortgage SL Green, the largest office landlord in NYC, receives from the Chinese lender.

Are these two loans going to set a trend? It might be too early to tell, but they sure rocked the boat a little.

As a lender, Deutsche Bank has proven quite active during this time. In March 2012, it added to its lending books a $142,148,560 mortgage secured against the 7-story office building at 10 East 52nd Street, Manhattan, after one of its subsidiaries, the German American Capital Corporation, had financed in February a $125,000,000 loan going to The Solow Building in Manhattan.

Last year during the period January-April the highest mortgage loan was the $175,000,000 associated with The Milford Plaza Hotel in Manhattan. Foreign banks competed again with the domestic ones, Deutsche Bank appearing once more as one of the main lenders, with a $125,000,000 mortgage loan going to The Sheffield at 322 West 57 Street, one of the most sought-after condo buildings in Midtown Manhattan.

Here are the rankings for the highest commercial mortgage loans for January-April 2011 and 2012:

NYC Top 5 New Mortgages in January 2012-April 2012


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NYC Top 5 New Mortgages in January 2011-April 2011



Posted on by Jacob Frydman in Commercial Real Estate, Guest Blog Post, Hotels, News Leave a comment

Banks Compete For CRE Lending

According to a recent report from the CoStar Group, banks have picked up their lending activity to commercial real estate in recent months – a sign the slow-but-steady economic recovery is beginning to pick up steam.

The report says banks that are lending again see lower risk owner-occupied properties and multifamily properties as preferred targets. But with lenders focusing on the same ‘safe shelter’ property sectors, it is creating widespread competition for the better-quality borrowers in those areas. The real battle ground may be next year from the coming opportunities in construction and development lending.

“The area of lending that we see being the most competitive on pricing continues to be the commercial real estate arena, with a lot of players in and including the life insurance companies,” said Kirk W. Walters, senior executive vice president and CFO of People’s United Financial Inc., a bank holding company in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Kelly S. King, chairman, CEO and president of BB&T Corp. in Winston-Salem, NC, told CoStar the competition is not yet so fierce that existing customers are getting picked off, but he did say banks are looking for more diversity as their own customer base is dwindling. Richard K. Davis, chairman, president and CEO of U.S. Bancorp in Minneapolis, MN, told the website the two coasts are where the activity is most competitive. And Joseph Ficarola, chairman, president and CEO of New York Community Bancorp, said that his $42 billion holding company in Westbury, NY, is only targeting the best borrowers.

In its quarterly survey of senior loan officers, the Federal Reserve found that business lending, or commercial and industrial loans, was enjoying increased demand – and greater competition among banks. The Fed reported that this was the second consecutive survey in which reports of stronger demand for such loans by domestic banks outnumbered reports of weaker demand. Reflecting this, commercial loans at commercial banks in the U.S. have risen about 15% between March 2011 and April 18, according to Fed banking-industry data.

Within this loan study, The Fed says most domestic banks generally reported having eased their lending standards and having experienced stronger demand over the past three months. Standards on C&I loans to large and middle-market firms, and to small firms, were about unchanged. However, moderate to large net fractions of domestic banks eased many terms on C&I loans to firms of all sizes, with most indicating that they had done so in response to more aggressive competition from other banks or nonbank lenders.

Domestic banks also reported an increase in loan demand from firms of all sizes. In contrast, a small net fraction of foreign respondents again reported a tightening of their lending standards on C&I loans and a decrease in demand for such loans. A moderate net fraction of domestic banks reported having eased standards for commercial real estate (CRE) loans. As has been the case recently, significant net fractions of domestic banks reported that demand for CRE loans had strengthened. On net, foreign branches and agencies reported that standards and demand for CRE loans were little changed.

Posted on by Jacob Frydman in Commercial Real Estate, News Leave a comment